Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy. State of the art (In Italian)

Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy. State of the art (In Italian)

282 CLINICAL IMAGING ABSTRACTS-SUMMARIES 1992;16:282-287 OF SELECTED JOURNAL ARTICLES CLINICAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY. STATE OF THE ART...

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282

CLINICAL

IMAGING

ABSTRACTS-SUMMARIES

1992;16:282-287

OF SELECTED JOURNAL ARTICLES

CLINICAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY. STATE OF THE ART (In Italian)

MR ANGIOGRAPHY FOR NEURO-PEDIATRIC PROBLEMS: TECHNIQUE AND CLINICAL RESULTS (In German)

Dalla Palma L, Magnaldi S, Ricci C, Longo R. (S. Magnaldi Istituto di Radiologia, UniversitB, Ospedale di Cattinara, Strada di Fiume, I-34149 Trieste TS, Italy). Radio1 Med 1992;83:7-23.

Vogl ThJ, Balzer JO, Stemmler J, et al. (Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt der Universitgt Miinchen, Ziemssenstrasse 1, D-8000 Miichen 2, Germany). RljFo 1992;156:112-119.

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique that allows the study of the chemical composition of tissue. In the first part of this article the authors describe the physical principles and the technical features of spectroscopy, including spectral acquisition, localization techniques, and peak quantification. The second part deals with the evaluation of the biological significance of the peaks observed in the most frequently studied spectra (31P and ‘H). The third part concerns the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance spectroscopy: In order to employ spectroscopy in the clinical practice, this technique should be able to fulfill such requirements as tissue characterization, metabolic quantification, therapy followup, biochemical understanding of the physiopathologic phenomena, and pH evaluation. The fourth and last part of the paper deals with the clinical applications of spectroscopy. The authors consider the results of other research groups in the spectroscopic evaluation of the striate muscle, the central nervous system, heart, liver, and some other organs. Then they describe some preliminary personal results in cerebral spectroscopy (41 healthy subjects studied with 31P and 5 with ‘H) and liver spectroscopy (19 healthy subjects studied with 31P and 9 healthy subjects and 9 patients with liver steatosis studied with ‘H). The authors conclude that the problem of the potential clinical application of spectroscopy is still open. So far the use of this technique is limited to research centers, which should point out the clinical role of spectroscopy.

Thirty-one children aged between 6 months and 14 years with various neurovascular abnormalities were examined by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a prospective study. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of the MRA results, these were compared in eight cases with the findings of digital subtraction angiography or conventional angiography. Arterial MRA was performed on 24 patients, 17 of whom showed anomalies or abnormalities of the intracranial vascular system. Venous MRA was performed on seven patients, demonstrating in six of them the presence of sinus thrombosis. Comparison between MRA and digital subtraction angiography showed agreement in seven cases; in one patient the degree of a stenosis was exaggerated by MRA. The results of this study indicate that arterial and venous MRA is of great value as an additional study in pediatric neurovascular problems.

Authors’ Summary (Numerous and demonstrative illustrations and up to date references enrich this important article, A.F.G.) 8 1992 by Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 655 Avenue of the Americas, 0899-7071/92/$5.00

New York, NY 10010

Authors’ Summary

MR IMAGING OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW: BASIC PRINCIPLES AND PRELIMINARY CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH T2*-WEIGHTED GRADIENT ECHO IMAGES AND BOLUS APPLICATION OF CONTRAST MEDIUM (In German)

Giickel F, Wentz KU, Briz G, et al. (Institut fiir Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer, D-6800 Mannheim 1, Germany). RijFo 1992;156:212-217. Paramagnetic contrast agents produce local magnetic field inhomogeneity when they pass through the cerebrovascular system. This effect can be monitored with T2*-weighted gradient echo images, which show transient signal loss, while a bolus of Gd-DTPA is passing through the brain tissue. This signal loss is correlated to the local cerebral tissue perfusion