Investigation on improve ash fusion temperature (AFT) of low-AFT coal by biomass addition

Investigation on improve ash fusion temperature (AFT) of low-AFT coal by biomass addition

New Resources for Nutrition Educators BOOK Mom’s Sugar Solution. 2018. Hoover LC. Simon and Schuster, 57 Littlefield St, Avon, MA 02322. Softcover bo...

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New Resources for Nutrition Educators

BOOK Mom’s Sugar Solution. 2018. Hoover LC. Simon and Schuster, 57 Littlefield St, Avon, MA 02322. Softcover book, 240 pp, $18.99, ISBN: 9781507204856. We all want to feed our kids healthy, nourishing foods—and that meant reducing their sugar intake. But how do you find wholesome meals kids actually want to eat?—Publisher Staying away from sweets is really hard! Children have a natural liking for sugar,1 so it is not their fault if they like them. There is no need for parents to fall into the “no sweets at all” camp and become the “sugar cop.” So how should parents manage their kids’ sugar cravings? Mom’s Sugar Solution offers an excellent solution for parents who are struggling to deal with the sugar problems with their kids. In this colorful cookbook, Laura Chalela Hoover includes 150 kid-favorite, lowsugar recipes for busy parents. The first chapter sets the stage to explain why parents may want to switch to low-sugar recipes. It starts with a general description of her perceived sugar epidemic in the world and differentiates between natural sugars and added sugars. The author then explains why kids like sugar and introduces 10 simple strategies to switch to low-sugar options. The recommended amounts of sugar intake for children and adults according to the 2015−2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans2 are highlighted in colored boxes to provide evidence-based guidance for parents. The whole chapter is written in an easy-to-read format that can be understood even for parents with no science background.

In chapters 2−9, a total of 150 low-sugar recipes are categorized into breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, drinks, sides, dips, and desserts. All recipes are provided with a list of ingredients, easy-to-read instructions, preparation and cooking times, and serving sizes. The author takes a step further to provide basic nutrient facts for each recipe such as calories, fat, and added sugar, to help parents monitor the calorie and nutrient intake of their children. Some recipes include nutrition tips to provide information about the benefits of a specific nutrients (eg, vitamin C), or recommendations to eat a certain food (eg, seafood). Most recipes feature natural ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables. Yet, the author is able to make these healthy foods into something pleasing and appetizing. Moreover, many recipes require just ≤ 15 minutes cook time (eg, veggie fried rice), which is great for busy parents. A

Inclusion of any material in this section does not imply endorsement by the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Evaluative comments contained in the reviews reflect the views of the authors. Review abstracts are either prepared by the reviewer or extracted from the product literature. Prices quoted are those provided by the publishers at the time materials were submitted. They may not be current when the review is published. Reviewers receive a complimentary copy of the resource as part of the review process. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2019;51:261−262 Ó 2018 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior  Volume 51, Number 2, 2019

guide for choosing breakfast cereal, inspiration to incorporate the lowsugar recipes into a meal plan, and a US/metric conversion chart are all found in the Appendix. Of course, this cookbook has problems. An area of concern is that the author seems to believe that natural sweeteners such as honey are healthier than cane sugar and thus can be used without conditions. Compared with cane sugar, honey does have some antioxidants and trace minerals and is often viewed as natural and healthy. However, research has not confirmed whether honey has the proposed beneficial effects on the human body. Actually, a study published in the Journal of Nutrition3 found that honey did not seem to be superior to cane sugar or high-fructose corn syrup when it came to glucose metabolism. This cookbook is a great resource for parents to prepare kids’ favorite foods with a low sugar content. Nutrition practitioners recommending this book should caution readers that replacing cane sugar with more honey does not necessarily lead to low sugar intake. They should still watch out about the amount they use. D1XCheng X Li, MS, D2X X Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Debra Palmer-Keenan, PhD, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2018.09.009

Cite this article as Li C, PalmerKeenan D. Mom’s Sugar Solution [New Resources for Nutrition Educators]. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2019;51:261−262.

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REFERENCES 1. Mennella JA, Bobowski NK. The sweetness and bitterness of childhood: Insights from basic research on taste preferences. Physiol Behav. 2015;152:502-507.

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior  Volume 51, Number 2, 2019 2. US Department of Health and Human Services. 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture; 2015. 3. Raatz SK, Johnson LK, Picklo MJ. Consumption of honey, sucrose, and high-

fructose corn syrup produces similar metabolic effects in glucose-tolerant and -intolerant individuals. J Nutr. 2015;145: 2265-2272.