Pharmacology and oral therapeutics

Pharmacology and oral therapeutics

192 BOOK REVIEWS J. Pros. Jan.-Feb., Den. 1960 The material covered is quite detailed at times from a technical standpoint. Descriptive writing a...

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192

BOOK

REVIEWS

J. Pros. Jan.-Feb.,

Den. 1960

The material covered is quite detailed at times from a technical standpoint. Descriptive writing alone does not suffice in these instances, and the profuse use of figures, diagrams, and photographs helps to clarify these areas ; the excellent quality of the paper enhances the illustrations. Unlike other textbooks, this one is unique in that it attempts to describe completely only one type of appliance. The reviewer feels that it accomplishes its purpose and reaches those who want a basic background in the edgewise arch orthodontic appliance. Benjamin H. Williams, D.D.S.

DESIGN FOR MAJOR CLEFT PALATE. By Horace Hayman Boyle, F.D.S., H.D.D., (R.C.S.EDIN.), H.D.D., L.D.S. (R.F.P.S.GLAS.), L ondon, 1957, Staples Press Limited. Pp. 120, 65 illustrations, indexed. Price $6.00. “This book has been prepared primarily for the dentist who is interested in the unusual prosthodontic problem. It has been designed also for the information of the dental technician, in order that the two can follow out procedures in their sequence.” These statements taken from the author’s preface state the purpose of this short book. Of the 120 pages, only 40 are actually spent on a description of the technique of constructing an appliance for a cleft palate. The rest of the book is made up of a great many photographs illustrating the high points in the construction of protheses for 5 patients. The subject matter is well organized. The book is concise and this is one of its shortcomings, because it does not give detailed instructions, on how to do some steps which are in themselves very complex. The text is hard to follow at times because certain theories, important to the author’s technique, are mentioned but never fully explained. The quality of the binding and of the photographs is very poor. The author attempts to show how to construct a complete denture with an obturator for a cleft palate. He describes an impression method, the setting of the teeth, and the construction of the obturator. His views on the subject of saving teeth are not in accordance with those generally held in this country :and may evoke some comment among the readers. Though Dr. Boyle had a laudable purpose in writing this book, I do not believe that his mission was accomplished. There are some, interesting facts, but not enough detailed information to help a dentist construct a denture for a patient with a cleft palate. James B. Boucher, D.D.S.

PHARMACOLOGY AND ORAL THERAPEUTICS. By Edward C. Dobbs, B.S., D.D.S., F.A.C.D., St. Louis, 1956, ‘The C. V. Mosby Company. Pp. 579, indexed, illustrated. Price $9.00. This is the eleventh revised edition of a book first published in 1909. It is designed primarily as a teaching aid for dental students and hygienists studying pharmacology, and for practicing dentists as a reference book on newer drugs and preparations. The contents are divided into two sections. The first section is restricted to pharmacology; the second is allocated to the study of dental and oral therapeutics-a unique feature. The author has classified drugs according to their therapeutic effect, e.g., drugs which depress the central nervous system, drugs which stimulate the central nervous system, general anesthetics, local ansethetics, drugs which affect the heart and blood, and those which affect the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems, etc. Each drug is listed usually by trade name, generic and, chemical composition, its pharmacodynamics, common usage, possible side effects, dosage, and toxicity. These monographs are concise and relevant, and show that the author has been guided by his extensive classroom experience and clinical practice.

BOOK

193

REVIEWS

The bibliographies are placed in fine print at the bottom of the page on which the citation appears-a welcome innovation. Another desirable feature is the inclusion of pharmaceutical classes, methods, and definitions, methods of administration, and factors which affect I:he action of drugs. The binding, paper, size of type, printing, spacing, and format are excellent, for which the publishers are to be commended. It is gratifying that a book of this size can incorporate most of the essentials from this comprehensive subject matter succinctly and clearly. I would recommend this volume to anyone interested in pharmacology. W. Russell Kampfer, D.D.S., LL.B. THE

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF REMOVABLE ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES. By C. Philip Adams, B.D.S., F.D.S., D. Orth., ed. 2, Bristol, Great Britain, 1957, John Wright & Sons Ltd., The Williams & Wilkins Co., Baltimore, exclusive U. S. agents. Pp. 120, 173 illustrations, indexed. Price $5.50.

The first edition of this book was written in an attempt to establish a systematic approach to the construction of removable orthodontic appliances. Some of the material included had been originally published in the DeNtal Practitioner, and to it was added other material from the Dental Record. With all of this have been included factors which affect the design and construction of removable orthodontic appliances. This second edition has elaborated upon the use of expansion screws, and added sections dealing with expansion and welding. The author has attempted to present the practical application in all areas of his subject matter. His style of writing is a little hard to follow at times, but the organization of the subject matter is well oriented with many illustration to show both technique and clinical results. The book is well bound and printed on a high-gloss paper. This book in one’s library could be extremely useful. The chapter on expansion appliances is quite applicable to the prosthodontist‘handling cleft palate cases. There are several examples of simple tooth movements to facilitate a better position for abutment teeth in fixed or removable prostheses. One point was stressed in the first chapter and then followed up in a chapter of its own with explanations. Bodily movement of teeth is quite difficult and, “As a general rule, removable appliances tilt the teeth, producing movement of the crowns.” The author, in Chapter X, attempts to give techniques to produce bodily movement and shows several illustrations of clinical cases. It might have been more positive to show before and after x-rays of such areas, also, to prove his point. Benjamin H. Williams, D.D.S. INTERVIEWING, COUNSELLING, AND MANAGING DENTAL PATIENTS. By S. Joseph Bregstein, D.D.S., Englewood Cliffs, New York, 1957, Prentice-Hall, Inc. Pp. 311, indexed.. Price $7.50. This volume represents an ambitious attempt by a well-known author and lecturer in the field of practice administration to give “expert guidance for creating an effective and profitable dentist-patient relationship.” The author confidently states that those who carefully study and follow each suggested step will “enjoy the success so many others have achieved.” The material presented is divided into 29 chapters arranged in 11 sections: “The Development of Patient Rapport,” “The First Interview,” “The Second Interview,” “Completing Your Case Presentation,” “The Patient and Fees,” “Your Patients and How to Retain Them,” “ Dealing with Juvenile Patients,” “ Letters That Improve Dentist-Patient Reto Apply it Successfully,” “How to Use Salesmanlationships,” “ Dental Psychiatry-How ship on Patients,” and “Hypnosis in Dentistry.”