Resonance in organic chemistry. By George Willard Wheland. John Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York, 1955. xiii+846 pp. 16 × 23.5 cm. Price $15

Resonance in organic chemistry. By George Willard Wheland. John Wiley&Sons, Inc., New York, 1955. xiii+846 pp. 16 × 23.5 cm. Price $15

192 JOURNAL OF THE AMERICANPHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION Remington’s Practice of Pharmacy. 11th ed. ERIC W. MARTJNand E. FULLERTON COOK, Editors. Mack...

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192

JOURNAL OF THE

AMERICANPHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION

Remington’s Practice of Pharmacy. 11th ed. ERIC W. MARTJNand E. FULLERTON COOK, Editors. Mack Publishing Company, Easton, Pa., 1956. xii 1707 pp. 6.5 x 22.5 x 29.5 cm. Price $18.

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The rapid pace of developments in pharmacy and its allied sciences is clearly reilected in the thorough revision of this book. However, the complete coverage of this volume is indicated by its thorough treatment of what is important t o pharmacy whether it is old or new; historical backgrounds t o newest drugs and applications of statistical methods t o analytical pharmacy. The grand scale of this treatise on pharmacy has still retained the admirable simplicity and clarity of presentation of elementary and advanced subject matter that users of earlier editions of Remington’s Practice of Pharmacy have found so satisfactory. Judicious use of space and deletion of expendable material have permitted inclusion of much valuable information with a n increase of only ninety-one pages over the 1616 pages of R. P. P. X. All text material relating to standard references has been brought into conformity with U. S. P. XV, N. F. X. B. P. 1953, Ph. I. vol. I and 11, N. N. R. 1955, etc. Each biological, chemical, pharmacological, and technical division of the pharmaceutical sciences has been thoroughly yet concisely covered by authorities in each field. Editors, Eric W. Martin and E. Fullerton Cook, and associate editors, E. E . Leuallen, Arthur Osol, Linwood F. Tice, and C. T. Van Meter, have enlisted the aid of more than 200 individuals in modernizing the material and its presentation. An enlarged section on physical pharmacy describes the theory and application of modem techniques such as chromatography and rheology. I n the sections devoted t o inorganic pharmacy, organic pharmacy, biological pharmacy, and analytical pharmacy, the text includes descriptions, chemistry, methods of preparation, pharmacology, therapeutic and pharmaceutical uses for official and important unofficialproducts such as vaccines (including poliomyelitis vaccine), diagnostic agents, vitamins, and other natural and synthetic compounds. Antibiotics, antihistamines, hormones (including prednisolone and prednisone), are fully covered. In any modem compilation of drug products, the rapidly changing picture makes revision a continuous necessity and it is practically impossible to keep informed of all the changes made. It is no reflection on the editors, who have made an excellent tabulation of antihistamines and products including these drugs, that Harv-amine (Harvey), containing pyrilamine maleate, page 859, is now Harvamine (Harvey), containing phenyltoloxamine dihydrogen utrate. Pharmaceutical dosage forms are covered in detail with extensive sections on manufacturing of tablets and other products and with special emphasis given t o parenteral preparations, ophthalmic solutions, and ointments. The useful information on specialties, including their composition, uses, and doses, includes old and new unofficial products. Hospital pharmacy is discussed a t length, bringing together in a drastically revised chapter much information in this important and rapidly developing field. The names of Don E. Francke and Herbert L. Flack among the assistant editors is assurance

Vol. XLV, No. 3

that this material has been handled realistically by practicing hospital phamacists. The usual readable style, type and format of Remington’s Practice of Pharmacy is continued in this edition. Use is made of the inside covers with heavy paste-in speets carrying tables of metric doses with approximate apothecary equivalents and logarithms (front) and a periodic chart of the elements (back). The text is replete with illustrations and includes convenient tabulations of surface-active agents, antihistamines, antibiotics, etc. The extensive index is necessary to the convenient use of the wealth of material in the text. The editors and their associates are to be congratulated on t& excellent revision of a book that should be available t o all who are interested in the study and practice of pharmacy and its allied sciences.

Resonance i n Organic Chemistry. By GEORGEWILLARD WHELAND. John Wiky & Sons, Inc., New York, 1955. xiii 846 pp. 16 x 23.5 cm. Price 9615. This book is a revised and expanded successor t o the author’s “The Theory of Resonance and Its Application to Organic Chemistry.” An indication of the growth of the subject in the ten years between publications is the Appendix which consists of a table of bond lengths and bond angles and which has expanded from 11 pages t o 105 pages. The book differs from the conventional treatment of organic chemistry in its explicit concern with the application of quantum mechanical methods t o problems of molecular structure. Its treatment of the subject is sound but can be followed without any special background in quantum mechanics. Except for the final chapter, the treatment is qualitative and nonmathematical. The molecular-orbital method for treating molecular structure is discussed in some detail. The mathematical background of the resonance concept is discussed in the newly added final chapter. The text material is divided under the following chapter headings: The Theory of Resonance, The Nature of Valence, Resonance Energy, Steric Effects of Resonance, Resonance and Dipole Moments, Resonance and Molecular Spectra, Resonance and Chemical Equilibrium, Resonance and Chemical Reaction, Mathematical Basis of Resonance. The 531 references cited in the text are listed at the end and author and subject indexes are included. The author feels that this new presentation of his material is significantly clearer and less confusing than the original publication. The format and printing of the book are good, the molecular and mathematical formulas being easily read. For anyone interested in this field the book is a must.

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The Preservation qf LVatural History Specimens. Vol. 1. Invertebrates. By REGINALD WAGSTAFFE and J. HAVELOCK FIDLER.The Philosophical Library, Inc., New York, 1955. xiii 205 pp. 19.5 x 25.5 cm. Price $10. This volume brings together accepted methods which enable demonstration and permanent preservation of taxonomic characters of specimens from most groups of invertebrates. The methods are clearly and completely described.

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