The Florentine Renaissance

The Florentine Renaissance

24 25 26 27 A long tenne des infarctus myocardiques antkrieurs. Arch Mal Coeur 55:736-753,1962 Maurice P, Ourbak P, Lenegre J: Evolution klectrique ...

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A long tenne des infarctus myocardiques antkrieurs. Arch Mal Coeur 55:736-753,1962 Maurice P, Ourbak P, Lenegre J: Evolution klectrique A long terme des infarctus myocardiques postkrieurs. Arch Mal Coeur 57: 1393-1408, 1964 Wilson FN, Johnston FD, Rosenbaum FF, et al: The precordial electrocardiogram. Am Heart J 27: 19-28, 1944 Kalbfleisch JM, Shadaksharappa KS, Conrad LL, et al: Disappearance of the Q deflection following myocardial infarction. Am Heart J 76: 193-198, 1968 Haiat R, Worthington FX, Castellanos A Jr, et al: Un-

usual normalization of the electrocardiogram on the 6th day of myocardial infarction. J Electrocardiol 4 :363-368, 1971 28 Cahen L: Explorations Fonctio~ellesCardio-vasculaires. Paris, Maloine Ed, 1970, p 103 29 De La Fuente DJ, Gambetta M, Goldbarg AN, et al: The significanw of transient Q waves. Circulation (Suppl 11) (abstracts) 45-46: 153,1972 30 Rubin IL, Gross H, Arbeit SR: Transitory abnormal Q waves during bouts of tachycardia. Am J Cardiol 11:859865,1963

The Florentine Renaissance While the humanists were busily immersing themselves in the cult and cultivation of Greek and Latin antiquity, the artists of the Italian Renaissance were blazing out a new vision of the emotional and intellectual world. They were engaged in the quest for the ideal beauty. This ideal and formal perfection was to rise from the congruence between its earthly representation and the ideal prototype that existed in the Platonic realm of Ideas. Ancient estheticians had laid down the fundamental laws of structure which were eternally, immutably valid for all future ages. The word "Renaissance," which we use today to describe the principal components and the universally recognized features of

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this time, was not really used until the sixteenth century, when the era could be observed retrospectively as past history. The word was first used to d e h e the recent past which still inspired the present; for Vasari, who coined the word "Renaissance," did not belong to the Renaissance, but was a "mannerist" artist and architect ( 15111574). Artists and humanists alike believed that before the "Dark Ages" had shrouded Europe, a Golden Age had lit up the world, and that its art and culture had contained the monopoly of all possible truths. Brion M : The Medici-A Great Florentine Family (translated by Cremonosi C and Cremonosi H, New York, Crown, 1969

CHEST, 65: 2, FEBRUARY, 1974